All-Consuming

Capitalist Culture (2012-2013)

Oxford Brookes University

All-Consuming

5b

Andrew Dawson and Igea Troiani


The DS1 studio, All-Consuming centred on the study of spatial, cultural and experiential capitalist consumption. It invited students to critically examine and question the environmental and cultural consequences of our current fetish for foreign cultural experience. Stimulated by the exotic experience of "elsewhere", it scrutinised human nature in both its capacity to be constructive and destructive of labour, resources and environment and the impact of economic dependency. It purposefully explored the tension between cultural diversity and globalisation. The studio expanded ideas found in Uncivilisation: The Dark Mountain Manifesto (Kingsnorth & Hine, 2010).


The studio adopted a multidisciplinary methodology. Students were asked to undertake fieldwork, and create a series of preliminary and final design artefacts and projects that use photography, video, sound recording and handcrafting.


So as to examine cultural tourism, a field trip to the popular tourist destinations of Istanbul and Cappadocia in Turkey took place. Cappadocia was the site for the main project. Like Edward Bellamy’s (1888) Looking Backward and William Morris’s (1890) News from Nowhere, students fantasised a post capitalist landscape in which society operates under a different set of rules about economic and cultural consumption and production. Through creative writing, students designed architectures that took a critical position on capital and the landscape. The architectures questioned our desire as tourists for an all-consuming experience.

5b

Capitalist Culture (2012-2013)

Oxford Brookes University

Andrew Dawson and Igea Troiani


The DS1 studio, All-Consuming centred on the study of spatial, cultural and experiential capitalist consumption. It invited students to critically examine and question the environmental and cultural consequences of our current fetish for foreign cultural experience. Stimulated by the exotic experience of "elsewhere", it scrutinised human nature in both its capacity to be constructive and destructive of labour, resources and environment and the impact of economic dependency. It purposefully explored the tension between cultural diversity and globalisation. The studio expanded ideas found in Uncivilisation: The Dark Mountain Manifesto (Kingsnorth & Hine, 2010).


The studio adopted a multidisciplinary methodology. Students were asked to undertake fieldwork, and create a series of preliminary and final design artefacts and projects that use photography, video, sound recording and handcrafting.


So as to examine cultural tourism, a field trip to the popular tourist destinations of Istanbul and Cappadocia in Turkey took place. Cappadocia was the site for the main project. Like Edward Bellamy’s (1888) Looking Backward and William Morris’s (1890) News from Nowhere, students fantasised a post capitalist landscape in which society operates under a different set of rules about economic and cultural consumption and production. Through creative writing, students designed architectures that took a critical position on capital and the landscape. The architectures questioned our desire as tourists for an all-consuming experience.